Lord Ullin’s Daughter

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Get here the summary and notes of NBSE class 9 English chapter Lord Ullin’s Daughter. However, these notes should be used only for references and additions/modifications should be made as per the requirements.

SUMMARY: A Scottish chieftain from Ulva’s isle wished to marry Lord Ullin’s daughter against her father’s wish. Hence she eloped with her lover. The chieftain and his beloved were chased by the kingsman on horses. He, therefore, urged the boatman to ferry them across Lochgyle to his land.

The chieftain told the boatman about his true love. The chieftain also offered the boatman some money. Lord Ullin’s Daughter too expressed her fear of separation. She said that she would rather meet the storm than face her angry father.

The boatman agreed to ferry them for the sake of the lovely daughter of Lord Ullin despite the impending storm. Unfortunately, the boat carrying the chieftain and his beloved in the stormy sea started to sink and the tempest gathered around them.

Lord Ullin, at this point, reached the shore only to see his daughter struggling in the storm. At once his wrath transformed into wailing as she and her lover were both drowning. Lord Ullin was completely devastated at the scene. He cried in grief persuading his daughter to come back. His daughter stretched out one hand for help. Her other hand was around her lover. But it was too late.

Lord Ullin’s daughter, the chieftain, and the boatman were drowned that night.

III. Read these lines and answer the questions given below.

1.’Cries, ‘Boatman do not tarry!
And I’ll give thee a silver pound
To row us o’er the ferry!

a) Who says these lines and to whom?
b) Where did they want to go? Why?
c) What is the meaning of ‘tarry’?

Ans: a) These lines were said by the Scottish chieftain to the boatman.

b) They wanted to go across Lochgyle to Ulva’s isle. They wanted to go because the men of Lord Ullin were chasing them as they had decided to marry without and the consent of Lord Ullin.

c) The meaning of tarry is to stay somewhere longer than expected or to delay in leaving a place.

2. ‘His horsemen hard behind us ride;
Should they our steps discover,
Then who will cheer my bonny bride
When they have slain her lover’-

a) Whose horsemen were following whom?
b) Why were they following them?
c) What was the speaker’s concern?
d) What is the rhyme scheme of these lines?

Ans: a) The horseman of Lord Ullin were following them.

b) They were following them because the chieftain and Lord Ullin’s daughter had decided to get married going against the will of Lord Ullin.

c) The speaker’s concern was that if the men of Lord Ullin could catch them then they would kill him and there would not be anyone to keep his beautiful bride happy after him.

d) The rhyme scheme of these lines is a,b,a,b.

3. Out spoke the hardy Highland wight
‘I’ll go, my chief-I’m ready:
It is not for your silver bright,
But for your winsome lady:

a) Who is the speaker?
b) Where was he ready to go?
c) What had been his fear?
d) Why did he agree to go?

Ans: a) The boatman is the speaker here.

b) He was ready to go across Lochgyle the storm and the darkness.

c) His fear was that it was dark and the weather was stormy.

d) He agreed to go because of the beautiful bride of the chieftain.

4. ‘Come back! Come back!’ he cried in grief
Across this stormy water:
And I’ll forgive your highland chief,
My daughter!-O my daughter!’

a) What is the mood of the speaker?
b) Why was his mood so?
c) Who was he saying this to?
d) What had happened to them?

Ans: a) The speaker is in a mournful mood.

b) His mood was so because he was seeing his daughter drowning in the midst of a storm and there was nothing he could do.

c) He was saying this to his daughter.

d) His daughter and her lover were trying to escape his wrath and were struck in the middle of a storm. In the end, they both drowned and died.

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