Haunted Houses: ICSE Class 10 English questions and answers

haunted houses ICSE class 10 english
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Get notes, line-by-line explanation, summary, questions and answers, critical analysis, word meanings, extras, and pdf of the poem “Haunted Houses” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow which is part of ICSE Class 10 English (Treasure Chest: A Collection of ICSE Poems and Short Stories). However, the notes should only be treated for references and changes should be made according to the needs of the students.

Summary

The poem starts by saying that every house where people have lived is haunted. Here, “houses” is our physical existence, and being “haunted” means we’re left with permanent impressions from the people we’ve known. These influences hover quietly like ghosts, often going unnoticed but still leaving their mark.

Longfellow suggests that these impressions are always present, appearing at various stages and transitions in life – in doorways, on stairs, and through passages. He is saying that at any given time, we are only conscious of a fraction of these influences. However, beneath the surface, our minds are crammed with memories, imprints, and echoes of past bonds, similar to a hall filled with polite, harmless spectres. 

The experiences and recollections of our interactions are deeply personal. An outsider might only see someone’s present self, but that person feels acutely their whole backstory and the many forces shaping their current views and emotions.

While we may feel ownership over our experiences and memories, Longfellow claims true ownership is hard to grasp. People from our past, even those forgotten, keep swaying our choices, perceptions, and sense of self.

The poem then zooms out to a bigger metaphysical perspective – that an ethereal realm of memories and old impacts envelops our tangible existence. This realm profoundly enriches our daily lives, giving depth and dimension to our present understanding.

Our lives are depicted as a delicate balance of past influences, some tugging us towards base desires, others lifting us towards higher aims. This balance is maintained by unseen or subtle influences, which Longfellow poetically compares to undiscovered stars or planets.

Using the moon as a metaphor, the poet stresses how past influences can light our path, guiding us through the vast expanse of life’s journey even as we head into the unknown.

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Line-by-line explanation of the poem

All houses wherein men have lived and died
Are haunted houses.

Here, the term “houses” is a metaphor for our bodies or lives, and being “haunted” indicates the indelible mark or influence left by the people we encounter. Just as every house has its history, every person carries the memories and impacts of past relationships and interactions.

Through the open doors
The harmless phantoms on their errands glide,
With feet that make no sound upon the floors.

Open doors signify moments of vulnerability or openness in our lives. The “harmless phantoms” symbolise individuals who’ve passed through our lives, sometimes unnoticed or unacknowledged, leaving subtle but meaningful imprints. Their silent movements suggest that often, the full depth of their influence isn’t immediately evident.

We meet them at the door-way, on the stair,
Along the passages they come and go,
Impalpable impressions on the air,

The various places mentioned (door-way, stair, passages) allude to the different phases and transitional moments in our lives. These people affect us at varying intensities and at different times, but their impact remains, even if it’s as elusive as “impressions on the air.”

There are more guests at table than the hosts
Invited; the illuminated hall
Is thronged with quiet, inoffensive ghosts,

Our conscious mind (the “table”) often only acknowledges a fraction of the influences and memories we carry. However, our subconscious (the “illuminated hall”) is filled with countless past interactions, represented here by the “quiet, inoffensive ghosts”.

The stranger at my fireside cannot see
The forms I see, nor hear the sounds I hear;
He but perceives what is; while unto me
All that has been is visible and clear.

Our experiences, memories, and the impact of past relationships are deeply personal. Others might only see our current state, but we are vividly aware of our history and the multitude of influences that shape our present perception and feelings.

We have no title-deeds to house or lands;
Owners and occupants of earlier dates
From graves forgotten stretch their dusty hands,
And hold in mortmain still their old estates.

This suggests that while we may feel ownership over our bodies and lives, we don’t truly own the influences and memories within us. People from our past, even those long forgotten, continue to impact our choices and perceptions.

The spirit-world around this world of sense
Floats like an atmosphere, and everywhere
Wafts through these earthly mists and vapours dense
A vital breath of more ethereal air.

The “spirit-world” signifies the realm of memories and past influences that envelope our tangible existence. This ethereal realm breathes life into our daily experiences, enriching our understanding and perspective.

Our little lives are kept in equipoise
By opposite attractions and desires;
The struggle of the instinct that enjoys,
And the more noble instinct that aspires.

Our lives are in a constant state of balance, shaped by both our baser instincts and higher aspirations. These instincts are influenced by the varied people we encounter, some pulling us toward momentary pleasures and others elevating us toward greater goals.

These perturbations, this perpetual jar
Of earthly wants and aspirations high,
Come from the influence of an unseen star
An undiscovered planet in our sky.

Our internal conflicts, the battle between our desires and aspirations, often arise from hidden or unacknowledged influences. This “unseen star” or “undiscovered planet” symbolises those powerful yet unrecognised people or moments that guide our inner compass.

And as the moon from some dark gate of cloud
Throws o’er the sea a floating bridge of light,
Across whose trembling planks our fancies crowd
Into the realm of mystery and night,

This picturesque imagery depicts how past influences can serve as guiding lights, much like how the moon illuminates a path across the sea. It emphasises the idea that our past shapes and influences our journey, even into the unknown.

So from the world of spirits there descends
A bridge of light, connecting it with this,
O’er whose unsteady floor, that sways and bends,
Wander our thoughts above the dark abyss.

Building on the previous imagery, this concludes the poem by suggesting that the world of past influences (or spirits) provides a connection to our present. As we navigate our lives, our decisions and feelings are continually shaped by those who’ve left their mark on us.

Word meanings

Haunted: In this context, it means deeply influenced or pervaded by memories or impressions of people from the past.

Houses: Representing the lives or bodies of individuals. A metaphor for the container of one’s experiences, memories, and the imprints of people they’ve met.

Phantoms: Ghostly figures, representing lingering memories, influences, or impressions of individuals who’ve passed through our lives.

Errands: Their purposes or reasons for influencing our lives.

Glide: Move smoothly and continuously, indicating the subtle and often unnoticed manner in which these influences manifest.

Door-way, Stair, Passages: Different phases, moments, or transitions in life. These are the points where we often encounter new people and experiences.

Impalpable: Difficult to feel or grasp, highlighting the elusive nature of some influences or memories.

Guests: The various people, memories, or influences present in our lives.

Hosts: Represents us or the individual’s conscious acknowledgment of these memories or people.

Illuminated hall: A space representing one’s conscious awareness or present state of mind.

Fireside: A personal, intimate space within oneself; one’s comfort zone or inner sanctum.

Forms: The clear memories or impressions of past interactions or individuals.

Title-deeds: Claims or rights to ownership.

Lands: Tangible assets or the physical aspects of life.

Mortmain: A term meaning ‘dead hand.’ Here, it signifies the unyielding grip or influence of past memories or individuals over one’s present life.

Estates: Represents assets, experiences, or memories one ‘owns’ in their life.

Spirit-world: The realm of memories, past influences, and impressions that surround our tangible reality.

Sense: Our current, tangible reality or conscious understanding.

Atmosphere: The enveloping space filled with past memories and influences.

Equipoise: Balance or equilibrium.

Attractions: Desires or tendencies influenced by past experiences or individuals.

Aspirations: Higher goals or ambitions, also influenced by our past.

Perturbations: Disturbances or conflicts within oneself.

Star, Planet: Unseen or unacknowledged influences guiding our inner decisions and feelings.

Moon: A guiding light or influence.

Gate of cloud: Obstacles or moments of obscurity in life.

Sea: The vast expanse of one’s life or experiences.

Bridge of light: The connection between past influences and the present.

Abyss: Deep, uncharted territory or the unknown aspects of one’s life.

About the author

The beloved 19th century American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow often turned to history and legend to remind his readers of their shared heritage. Works like “The Song of Hiawatha,” based on Native American oral traditions, and “Paul Revere’s Ride,” celebrating a pivotal moment in the Revolutionary War, cemented Longfellow’s status as a chronicler of the American experience.

In “Haunted Houses,” the “phantoms” are not vengeful spirits or mischievous poltergeists; they are the lingering memories and influences of people now gone. Longfellow suggests these spectral impressions quietly share our spaces and activities, observing our daily lives. Though we may not actively notice them, the ghosts of loved ones remain connected to us, floating through our consciousness.

The gentle, singsong rhythm and rhyme scheme, along with Longfellow’s peaceful tone, evoke solace rather than fear. His assertion that all houses are “haunted” is a reassuring acknowledgement that those we’ve lost can still inhabit our lives and thoughts, as long as we hold them in our memories. Rather than a frightening concept, Longfellow presents a vision of haunting that is comforting – our departed loved ones never truly leave us, but remain imprinted on our hearts and woven into the fabric of our lives.

Workbook answers/solutions

Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs)

1. Longfellow presents his ghosts as:

(a) sinister (b) inoffensive (c) menacing (d) ugly

Answer: B. inoffensive

2. Ghosts in the poem move about

(a) in search of some victim (b) on some errands (c) aimlessly (d) in search of food

Answer: B. on some errands

3. Which of these statements is NOT true?

(a) The speaker cannot see or hear ghosts. (b) The speaker can see or hear ghosts. (c) All houses are frequented by ghosts. (d) Ghosts do not harm human beings.

Answer: A. The speaker cannot see or hear ghosts.

4. What kind of spirit-world is conceived?

(a) ugly (b) beautiful (c) delicate and quiet (d) sensitive

Answer: C. delicate and quiet

5. The ghosts visit their former dwellings as

(a) guests (b) owners (c) strangers (d) onlookers

Answer: B. owners

6. What kind of bridge on the sea waves is imagined?

(a) solid (b) waving (c) steady (d) perpetual

Answer: B. waving

7. ‘As silent as the pictures on the wall’. Which figure of speech is used in this line?

(a) irony (b) metaphor (c) sarcasm (d) simile

Answer: D. simile

8. Who are referred to as the ‘Owners and occupants of earlier dates’?

(a) ghosts (b) strangers (c) landlords (d) ancestors

Answer: D. ancestors

9. The phrase ‘hold in mortmain’ implies

(a) temporary ownership (b) permanent ownership (c) no ownership (d) mortgaged

Answer: B. permanent ownership

10. What brings in balance in human lives?

(a) religious books (b) opposite forces in life (c) opposite attractions and desires (d) good values

Answer: C. opposite attractions and desires

Comprehension Passages

PASSAGE-1 All houses wherein men have lived and died
Are haunted houses. Through the open doors
The harmless phantoms on their errands glide,
With feet that make no sound upon thefloors

(i) What kind of opening statement is made by the poet?

Answer: The poet makes a metaphorical opening statement, suggesting that all individuals carry with them the indelible influences of people they have known throughout their lives, akin to how houses are “haunted” by the spirits of those who have lived and died in them.

(ii) In what way are all houses ‘haunted’?

Answer: The ‘haunted’ houses represent individuals’ lives marked by the enduring presence and influences of people they have encountered, whose memories and impacts linger like harmless phantoms.

(iii) The phrase ‘harmless phantoms’ seems to be exceptional. Why?

Answer: The phrase ‘harmless phantoms’ is exceptional because it reframes the typical notion of haunting, portraying these enduring influences as benign rather than malevolent, emphasizing their subtle, often unnoticed presence in our lives.

(iv) What kind of the spirit-world is conceived by the poet later in the context?

Answer: The poet later conceptualizes the spirit-world as a benign, ethereal layer surrounding our everyday existence, where the quiet influences of past associations float around us, enriching our lives without direct visibility or acknowledgment.

(v) Where can we, according to the poet, meet ghosts?

Answer: According to the poet, we encounter these ‘ghosts’—the lingering influences of past associations—in everyday moments and places, such as at the doorway, on the stair, and along the passages of our lives, subtly impacting our thoughts and actions.

PASSAGE-2 We meet them at the doorway, on the stair,
Along the passages they come and go,
Impalpable impressions on the air,
A sense of something moving to and fro.

(i) What kind of ghosts are conceived by the poet earlier in the context?

Answer: Earlier in the context, the poet conceived of ‘ghosts’ as the benign, invisible impressions left by people we’ve known, affecting our lives in quiet, often unnoticed ways.

(ii) Where do we ‘meet’ them? Are they visible?

Answer: We ‘meet’ these ‘ghosts’ in the metaphorical spaces of our existence—our memories and experiences—where they influence us subtly, not visible to the eye but felt in the heart and mind.

(iii) Explain the last two lines.

Answer: The last two lines express that these influences are intangible, like impressions on the air, felt rather than seen, as a sensed presence or impact moving through our lives, guiding or affecting us in unseen ways.

(iv) Which figure of speech is used in Line 3?

Answer: In Line 3, a metaphor is used, likening the intangible influences of people in our lives to ‘impalpable impressions on the air’, emphasizing their unseen yet felt presence.

(v) Where do they ‘throng’, as mentioned later in the context?

Answer: As mentioned later, these influences ‘throng’ our mental and emotional spaces, particularly during moments of reflection or decision-making, much like quiet, inoffensive ghosts filling an illuminated hall, silently shaping our lives.

PASSAGE-3 There are more guests at table than the hosts
Invited; the illuminated hall
Is thronged with quiet, inoffensive ghosts,
As silent as the pictures on the wall.

(i) Who are uninvited guests at table?

Answer: The uninvited guests at the table metaphorically represent the unexpected, often unconscious influences of people from our past, whose memories and impacts join us in the journey of life without formal acknowledgment.

(ii) Why are they there uninvited?

Answer: They are there uninvited because their influences on us were not consciously chosen but naturally accrued over time, shaping our thoughts and actions subtly, like guests who have silently taken their place at the table of our lives.

(iii) What is surprising about these uninvited ghosts?

Answer: What is surprising about these uninvited ‘ghosts’ is their benign presence, contradicting the typically ominous connotation of hauntings, and highlighting how these influences can quietly enrich our lives, unnoticed yet impactful.

(iv) Which figure of speech is used in the last line here?

Answer: The figure of speech used in the last line is a simile, comparing the silent influence of these ‘ghosts’ to the silence of pictures on the wall, underscoring their quiet yet pervasive presence in our lives.

(v) What can the speaker see and hear which others cannot, as referred to later in the context?

Answer: The speaker, perhaps more introspective or sensitive, can perceive the subtle impacts and presences of these ‘ghosts’—the enduring influences of past relationships—more acutely than others, seeing and hearing their guidance and impact where others may not.

PASSAGE-4 The stranger at my fireside cannot see
Theforms I see, nor hear the sounds I hear;
He but perceives what is; while unto me
All that has been is visible and clear.

(i) What contrast is made in the first two lines here?

Answer: The contrast made in the first two lines highlights the difference between the speaker’s ability to perceive the subtle influences and memories of past associations, likened to seeing and hearing ‘ghosts’, and a stranger’s inability to perceive beyond the tangible present.

(ii) What do you think of the extraordinary powers of the speaker?

Answer: The speaker’s ‘extraordinary powers’ suggest a heightened sensitivity or awareness to the layered complexities of human existence, enabling them to perceive the enduring impacts of past relationships and experiences that others might overlook.

(iii) What has been told by the speaker about the unseen ‘forms’ earlier in the context?

Answer: Earlier in the context, the speaker described the unseen ‘forms’ as the benign, invisible presences of people who have left an indelible mark on our lives, their influences felt as ‘impalpable impressions on the air’ or a sensed presence moving through our existence.

(iv) ‘All that has been is visible and clear. Explain.

Answer: ‘All that has been is visible and clear’ conveys the idea that the speaker possesses a profound connection to their past, with the ability to clearly perceive and reflect upon the impacts of past relationships and experiences, as if these elements were still present and tangible.

(v) Who is ‘He’ in Line 3? Is he a normal human being?

Answer: ‘He’ in Line 3 refers to a stranger or any individual other than the speaker, presumably a normal human being who perceives the world in a more conventional, less introspective manner, focusing on the physical reality rather than the nuanced influences of past associations.

PASSAGE-5 We have no title-deeds to house or lands;
Owners and occupants of earlier dates
From graves forgotten stretch their dusty hands,
And hold in mortmain still their old estates.

(i) What conception of ghosts is given earlier in the context?

Answer: Earlier in the context, ‘ghosts’ are conceived as metaphorical representations of the lasting influences and memories of people we’ve known, shaping our thoughts and lives in subtle, often unnoticed ways.

(ii) Where can we ‘meet’ the departed spirits?

Answer: We ‘meet’ the departed spirits in the corridors of our memories and experiences, where their influence persists as if they still occupied a place in our lives, impacting us in unseen but significant ways.

(iii) Who do not have title-deeds to their ‘house or lands’?

Answer: In the metaphorical sense, individuals do not have permanent title-deeds to their ‘house or lands’, suggesting that our lives and the impacts we make are not owned or fixed but are part of a larger continuum of influence and memory.

(iv) What do the departed spirits claim from their graves?

Answer: From their graves, the departed spirits claim a continuing connection to the living world, asserting a metaphorical ‘ownership’ or presence within the lives they’ve touched, much like holding onto their influence from beyond.

(v) Explain the phrase ‘hold in mortmain’.

Answer: The phrase ‘hold in mortmain’ refers to the enduring grip or influence the departed have on the living, suggesting that their impacts and memories hold a place in our lives with a permanence that transcends legal or physical ownership.

PASSAGE-6 The spirit-world around this world of sense
Floats like an atmosphere, and everywhere
Wafts through these earthly mists and vapours dense
A vital breath of more ethereal air.

(i) Why does the poet describe all houses as haunted earlier in the context?

Answer: The poet describes all houses as ‘haunted’ to metaphorically express the idea that everyone carries with them the enduring influences of people they have encountered, shaping their being in a manner akin to spirits inhabiting a house.

(ii) How have the ghosts been described by the poet?

Answer: The ‘ghosts’ have been described by the poet as benign and intangible presences—memories and influences of past relationships that hover around us, subtly shaping our lives and decisions without direct visibility.

(iii) What can the speaker see or hear?

Answer: The speaker can see and hear the quiet, often unnoticed impacts of these metaphorical ‘ghosts’, perceiving the nuanced layers of influence and memory that shape the fabric of their existence.

(iv) What kind of the world of spirits is?

Answer: The world of spirits is described as a delicate, ethereal realm that surrounds and permeates the tangible world, where the influences of past associations float like an atmosphere, influencing the living in subtle yet profound ways.

(v) What crosses through earthly mists and vapours?

Answer: A ‘vital breath of more ethereal air’ crosses through the earthly mists and vapours, symbolizing the permeation of the spiritual influences and memories of past relationships through the dense complexity of our tangible, day-to-day existence.

PASSAGE-7 Our little lives are kept in equipoise
By opposite attractions and desires;
The struggle of the instinct that enjoys,
And the more noble instinct that aspires.

(i) Whose lives are being referred to in Line 1?

Answer: The lives being referred to are those of all individuals, emphasizing the universal experience of being influenced by a blend of contrasting desires and memories from past associations.

(ii) What brings about balance in our short lives?

Answer: Balance in our lives is brought about by the interplay of opposite attractions and desires—the innate urge for pleasure and the aspiration for higher, more noble goals, reflecting the complex influences of past relationships.

(iii) Explain the last two lines.

Answer: The last two lines depict the internal conflict between the instinctual pursuit of immediate gratification and the aspiration towards higher, more altruistic goals, illustrating how our lives are shaped by a blend of varied influences from people we’ve known.

(iv) State what fills our life with anxieties and fears, as mentioned later in the context.

Answer: Anxieties and fears in our lives are filled by the perpetual internal conflict between earthly desires and higher aspirations, influenced by the unseen force of past relationships and the uncharted impacts of memories.

(v) What ‘bridge of light’ connects our world to the heavenly world?

Answer: The ‘bridge of light’ that connects our world to the heavenly realm symbolizes the pathway through which the influences of past associations and memories transcend the tangible world, guiding our thoughts and emotions towards the ethereal and the unknown.

PASSAGE-8 These perturbations, this perpetualjar
Of earthly wants and aspirations high,
Comefrom the influence of an unseen star
An undiscovered planet in our sky.

(i) What brings about balance in our lives, as mentioned earlier in the context?

Answer: Balance in our lives, as mentioned earlier, is achieved through the equilibrium between the conflicting desires for sensual pleasures and the yearning for higher, more noble aspirations, influenced by the enduring impacts of past associations.

(ii) The poet uses a metaphor in the first two lines. Explain it.

Answer: The metaphor in the first two lines likens the internal turmoil and conflict arising from our earthly wants and higher aspirations to a ‘perpetual jar’, suggesting that these contrasting forces continuously shape and redefine our existence.

(iii) What do you mean by ‘earthly wants and aspirations high’?

Answer: ‘Earthly wants and aspirations high’ refer to the duality of human nature: the pursuit of material and sensory pleasures versus the pursuit of lofty, altruistic, and spiritual goals, illustrating how past influences shape our desires and motivations.

(iv) What are ‘perturbations’?

Answer: ‘Perturbations’ are the disturbances or fluctuations in our mental and emotional state, caused by the ongoing conflict between material desires and spiritual or higher aspirations, influenced by the memories and impacts of those we’ve encountered.

(v) What is determined by an unseen, undiscovered planet in our sky?

Answer: The metaphorical ‘unseen, undiscovered planet’ suggests that external, unknown forces, possibly symbolizing the influence of past associations and memories, play a role in shaping our internal conflicts, desires, and aspirations, influencing our lives in profound ways.

PASSAGE-9 And as the moon from some dark gate of cloud
Throws o’er the sea floating bridge of light,
Across whose trembling planks our fancies crowd
Into the realm of mystery and night,-

(i) When and how is a ‘bridge of light’ formed?

Answer: A ‘bridge of light’ is formed when the moon emerges from behind dark clouds, casting a luminous path across the sea. This imagery symbolizes the connection between the tangible world and the realm of memory and influence, illuminating the path of our thoughts towards the unknown.

(ii) What is the function of this bridge?

Answer: The function of this bridge is to provide a metaphorical pathway for our thoughts and emotions to traverse from the realm of everyday reality into the domain of mystery, memory, and the ethereal influences of those we’ve known.

(iii) Which figure of speech is used in the first two lines here?

Answer: The figure of speech used in the first two lines is a metaphor, likening the moonlight’s reflection on the sea to a ‘floating bridge of light’, symbolizing the connection between the physical world and the realm of memories and past influences.

(iv) Where does our fancy take us?

Answer: Our fancy takes us into the ‘realm of mystery and night’, a metaphorical journey into the depths of our memories and the unseen influences of past relationships, exploring the ethereal and the unknown aspects of our existence.

(v) Which rhyme scheme is used in this stanza?

Answer: The rhyme scheme used in this stanza is ABAB, a common pattern in the poem that ties the imagery and themes together, enhancing the lyrical quality and the evocative exploration of memories and influences.

PASSAGE-10 So from the world of spirits there descends
A bridge of light, connecting it with this,
O’er whose unsteady floor, that sways and bends,
Wander our thoughts above the dark abyss.

(i) What has the poet told us about the world of spirits?

Answer: The poet has told us that the world of spirits, representing the cumulative influences and memories of past relationships, exists as an ethereal realm closely connected to our tangible world, affecting us in unseen ways through a metaphorical ‘bridge of light’.

(ii) Where can we ‘meet’ the departed spirits?

Answer: We ‘meet’ the departed spirits within the realms of our memories and emotions, where their influences linger and shape our thoughts and feelings, symbolized by the moments we reflect on their impact upon our lives.

(iii) What is the significance of ‘So’ in Line 1?

Answer: The significance of ‘So’ in Line 1 introduces a comparison or continuation, linking the metaphorical depiction of the moon’s bridge of light to the idea that similarly, the world of spirits connects to ours, influencing our thoughts and guiding us across the unseen.

(iv) Which bridge descends from the world of spirits? What has it been compared to?

Answer: The bridge that descends from the world of spirits is a metaphorical ‘bridge of light’, likened to the moonlight’s reflection on the sea, symbolizing the pathway through which the influences of past relationships and memories enter our consciousness.

(v) What do we often think of?

Answer: We often think of the mysteries of existence, the unknown, and the profound impacts of our past relationships, as we traverse the metaphorical ‘bridge of light’, contemplating the ethereal and the enduring influences that shape our lives and thoughts.

Additional/Extra questions and answers

1. How does Longfellow describe all houses where men have lived and died?

Answer: Longfellow poetically refers to all houses where men have lived and died as “haunted houses.” In this context, the term “haunted” doesn’t refer to ghostly apparitions in the traditional spooky sense. Instead, it evokes the idea that memories, emotions, and experiences of the past inhabitants still linger, making their presence felt in subtle and profound ways.

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44. In what ways does Longfellow challenge traditional notions of the supernatural in this poem?

Answer: Instead of presenting the supernatural as something fearful or malevolent, Longfellow depicts it as a benign and ever-present influence. The “harmless phantoms” and “quiet, inoffensive ghosts” stand in contrast to traditional ghostly figures that haunt and terrorize. Longfellow’s ghosts are simply remnants of the past, memories and influences that permeate our lives. By doing so, he reframes the supernatural not as distant and eerie entities, but as familiar, omnipresent echoes of previous lives and times that silently shape our present.

Additional/Extra MCQs

1. How does Longfellow describe the houses wherein men have lived and died?

A. As beautiful monuments B. As haunted houses C. As empty shells D. As remnants of history

Answer: B. As haunted houses

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30. What does Longfellow suggest about the connection between the past and the present?

A. The past is always haunting the present B. The past and present are completely disconnected C. The past has a silent and profound influence on the present D. The present is always overshadowed by the past

Answer: C. The past has a silent and profound influence on the present.

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